ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. (AP) — Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee are returning, and an author named Hillerman will be creating the next chapters in their lives. But this time it will be Anne Hillerman, not her legendary and award-winning father Tony Hillerman, who will chronicle Leaphorn and Chee as they solve new mysteries and expose readers to Navajo culture. The daughter plans to extend her late dad’s New York Times best-selling, 18-book series of Leaphorn-Chee mysteries with “Spider Woman’s Daughter, ” scheduled to be published by HarperCollins in the fall of 2013. And Anne Hillerman says another character will be getting more page-time in the next book. When Tony Hillerman finished the 2004 mystery “Skeleton Man” — second to last in the series — Anne was thrilled to see the character Bernadette Manuelito find some stolen diamonds and confront the villain. “In that book, she really acts like a police officer and not just the love-struck girlfriend of Jim Chee, ” she said in an interview from her Santa Fe office. “But in the end, Jim Chee saves the day. I was sad she had to get rescued. But (Dad) said, ‘I think you’re right. I could do more with her. ‘” Her father died in Albuquerque in 2008, leaving a daunting legacy. The winner of every major award for mystery fiction, including France’s esteemed Grand prix de literature policiere, Tony Hillerman also served as president of the prestigious Mystery Writers of America. He won that group’s coveted Edgar Award, named in honor of Edgar Allan Poe, and its Grand Master award. A few of his books have been turned into movies, most successfully by PBS and director Chris Eyre, now film chairman at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design. Noted for their cultural details, the Hillerman stories take place mostly in the dramatic desert beauty of the Four Corners region. Publishers translated them into eight languages, including Danish and Japanese, and he received a commendation from the Navajo Tribal Council. Anne has spent most of her own writing career penning nonfiction, with books such as “Tony Hillerman’s Landscape, ” ”The Gardens of Santa Fe” and “Santa Fe Flavors. ” And she has described Santa Fe’s dining scene as the Journal’s freelance restaurant critic since 2001. She says she is finally ready to dip her pen into fiction. Anne crossed the country in 2010-11, giving 50 to 60 talks about her own books and her father. Whether she was in Washington, D. C., or California, someone usually approached her for more. “People would say to me, ‘Was there another novel in his computer or in a desk drawer? ‘” she said. “There wasn’t. ” Her father’s fans planted a seed. Anne started writing her own Chee-Leaphorn mystery three years ago. “I felt like his characters were part of the family, ” she said. “I had heard him talk about these guys like they were real guys. It was ‘Leaphorn this’ and ‘Chee that. ‘” She admits to a few reservations. She shipped the manuscript off to her father’s old publisher in September. She asked the editor to tell her if she had kept the right tone and remained true to her father’s characters. Carolyn Marino was Tony Hillerman’s HarperCollins editor from 1990 until his death. “I knew (Anne) was working on it, ” she said. “She and I have stayed in touch. “I read five pages, and I knew it was just wonderful. ” “Anne is a very fine writer on her own, ” Marino continued. “She’s very talented. Anne is also certainly very protective and concerned and aware of the value of protecting her father’s estate and legacy. “I don’t think anybody could do exactly what Tony Hillerman did, ” she said. “His writing was very unique. There’s a beautiful simplicity to his prose. “But Anne’s book is beautifully written, and it continues the story in a way that Tony’s fans will love. “

ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. (AP) — Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee are returning, and an author named Hillerman will be creating the next chapters in their lives.
But this time it will be Anne Hillerman, not her legendary and award-winning father Tony Hillerman, who will chronicle Leaphorn and Chee as they solve new mysteries and expose readers to Navajo culture.
The daughter plans to extend her late dad’s New York Times best-selling, 18-book series of Leaphorn-Chee mysteries with “Spider Woman’s Daughter, ” scheduled to be published by HarperCollins in the fall of 2013.
And Anne Hillerman says another character will be getting more page-time in the next book.
When Tony Hillerman finished the 2004 mystery “Skeleton Man” — second to last in the series — Anne was thrilled to see the character Bernadette Manuelito find some stolen diamonds and confront the villain.
“In that book, she really acts like a police officer and not just the love-struck girlfriend of Jim Chee, ” she said in an interview from her Santa Fe office.
“But in the end, Jim Chee saves the day. I was sad she had to get rescued. But (Dad) said, ‘I think you’re right. I could do more with her. ‘”
Her father died in Albuquerque in 2008, leaving a daunting legacy.
The winner of every major award for mystery fiction, including France’s esteemed Grand prix de literature policiere, Tony Hillerman also served as president of the prestigious Mystery Writers of America.
He won that group’s coveted Edgar Award, named in honor of Edgar Allan Poe, and its Grand Master award. A few of his books have been turned into movies, most successfully by PBS and director Chris Eyre, now film chairman at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design.
Noted for their cultural details, the Hillerman stories take place mostly in the dramatic desert beauty of the Four Corners region.
Publishers translated them into eight languages, including Danish and Japanese, and he received a commendation from the Navajo Tribal Council.
Anne has spent most of her own writing career penning nonfiction, with books such as “Tony Hillerman’s Landscape, ” ”The Gardens of Santa Fe” and “Santa Fe Flavors. ” And she has described Santa Fe’s dining scene as the Journal’s freelance restaurant critic since 2001.
She says she is finally ready to dip her pen into fiction.
Anne crossed the country in 2010-11, giving 50 to 60 talks about her own books and her father. Whether she was in Washington, D. C., or California, someone usually approached her for more.
“People would say to me, ‘Was there another novel in his computer or in a desk drawer? ‘” she said. “There wasn’t. ”
Her father’s fans planted a seed. Anne started writing her own Chee-Leaphorn mystery three years ago.
“I felt like his characters were part of the family, ” she said. “I had heard him talk about these guys like they were real guys. It was ‘Leaphorn this’ and ‘Chee that. ‘”
She admits to a few reservations. She shipped the manuscript off to her father’s old publisher in September. She asked the editor to tell her if she had kept the right tone and remained true to her father’s characters.
Carolyn Marino was Tony Hillerman’s HarperCollins editor from 1990 until his death.
“I knew (Anne) was working on it, ” she said. “She and I have stayed in touch.
“I read five pages, and I knew it was just wonderful. ”
“Anne is a very fine writer on her own, ” Marino continued. “She’s very talented. Anne is also certainly very protective and concerned and aware of the value of protecting her father’s estate and legacy.
“I don’t think anybody could do exactly what Tony Hillerman did, ” she said. “His writing was very unique. There’s a beautiful simplicity to his prose.
“But Anne’s book is beautifully written, and it continues the story in a way that Tony’s fans will love. “